Archive for January, 2014

Giants’ Shoulders #67 under early modern medical care.

January 16, 2014

The #histsci, #histmed and #histtech blog carnival, Giants’ Shoulder #67, is residing at Early Modern Medicine and is very obviously thriving under the medical attention of Dr Jen (@historianjen). Despite the production of suitable blog post being in the doldrums during the holiday period a large crop of history of science reading matter has come together for your delectation. So wander on over and discover why Newton published so little, why people are fascinated by images of women with scientific instruments, how to cure the ‘Kink’, or all about Einstein’s interest in folklore, to name just a few of the fascinating topics to be found there.

Next months history of all things scientific blog carnival, Giants’ Shoulders #68, is going on a long journey following in the wake of Vasco da Gama all the way to the sub continent of India where it will be hosted by Fade Singh (@fadesingh) on his Compass Wallah blog on 16th February 2014. As always submission can be made either directly to the host or to me here at The Renaissance Mathematicus or on both of us on Twitter (@rmathematicus) by 15th February 2014 at the latest.

Advertisements

Giants’ Shoulders #67 is approaching the runway.

January 8, 2014

OK all you history of STEM freaks the Twelve Days of Christmas are finally over, the goose has been well and truly cooked and devoured, the fireworks have been shot and the bubbly slurped, and the Christmas tree had been undecorated and dumped on the compost heap. It is now time to get off those overfed arses and write those first killer history of science, technology or medicine blog posts for 2014 and submit them to Giants’ Shoulders #67 the history of science blog carnival, the all year round festival.

You can make those submissions directly to your January host, Jen Evens (@HistorianJen), at Early Modern Medicine using the Guest Bloggers form or on Twitter or to me here at The Renaissance Mathematicus or on Twitter (@rmathematicus) up to the 15th of January.  So get those flabby writing muscles in gear and let’s make it a good start to the history of science year.


%d bloggers like this: